New York exhibition displays rarely Seen furniture by Italian architect Gaetano Pesce
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New York exhibition displays rarely Seen furniture by Italian architect Gaetano Pesce

A jagged black bookshelf plus a series of modular armchairs

Pesce’s work embraces flaws and mistakes and disregards many Of the modernist techniques and styles that were popular in the time he made a lot of their work on screen

Realised designs that the 79-year-old made between 1968 to 1995.

“Age of Contaminations looks back on Pesce’s heritage as a Provocateur, rule-breaker, along with also an important influence on the evolution of contemporary design,” Friedman Benda said.

Presented for the first time is Carenza bookcase, a crooked Black and red epoxy resin shelving unit Pesce created for the residence of Italian scientist Alberto Carenza

Its name is a reference to a 1972 installation in the Museum of Modern Art which featured the architect’s job”Project for an Underground City at the Age of Great Contaminations,” a fictionalised archeological discovery in 3000 BCE of an undercover habitat by 2000 BCE.

The selected works are Meant to show Pesce’s”radical Experimentation” with materiality and manufacturing procedures. Featuring jagged and rough edges, and lively shapes, he refused to conform to the conventional modern style popular in the time of their own making.

Stacked glass bricks form the legs of Golgotha Table, which Is topped with a painterly, reddish resin surface

“Pesce’s groundbreaking experimentation with industrial and Everyday materials such as polyurethanes and poured resins broke the mould of standardisation,” the gallery stated. “Inventing techniques that could create variable results that adopted flaws and mistakes, he refused to follow the modernist ideology of regularity and perfection dominant at the time.”

“By refusing to adhere to traditional boundaries between Architecture, sculpture, and conceptual art, Pesce’s cross-contamination between genres consequentially altered the landscape of design and was a catalyst for the organization of the contemporary studio practice,” it added.

On display is a group of Yeti Armchairs, modular

Also featured in the display is a black version of Gaetano Pesce’s Up5 chair and a reddish Up6 pouff. The Italian designer is known worldwide for his Up furniture series, modelled after the form of a woman’s body. This season feminists criticised the designer after he installed an eight-metre high version of the Up5 armchair and Up6 footstool at Milan’s to the town’s design week.

Other designs include the modular Yeti Armchairs constructed With memory foam, and white buttons and upholstery

Pesce’s Moloch Floor Lamp uses anodised aluminium to create A flexible stand paired with a painted aluminum colour and base.

Black glass bricks stack on top of one another to form the Red resin has been used on the tabletop surface to provide the allusion that the material is dripping off the item.

A number of custom pieces Pesce made for the personal Apartment of Italian scientist Alberto Carenza will also be presented for the first time in the exhibition. Among these works is that the”eponymous monumental” Carenza Bookcase, a black and red shelving with jagged edges coated in epoxy resin.

Pesce utilized anodised aluminium and painted aluminum to Build Moloch Floor Lamp, that includes an adjustable height rack.

A jagged black bookshelf plus a series of modular armchairs

Pesce’s work embraces flaws and mistakes and disregards many Of the modernist techniques and styles that were popular in the time he made a lot of their work on screen

Realised designs that the 79-year-old made between 1968 to 1995.

“Age of Contaminations looks back on Pesce’s heritage as a Provocateur, rule-breaker, along with also an important influence on the evolution of contemporary design,” Friedman Benda said.

Presented for the first time is Carenza bookcase, a crooked Black and red epoxy resin shelving unit Pesce created for the residence of Italian scientist Alberto Carenza

Its name is a reference to a 1972 installation in the Museum of Modern Art which featured the architect’s job”Project for an Underground City at the Age of Great Contaminations,” a fictionalised archeological discovery in 3000 BCE of an undercover habitat by 2000 BCE.

The selected works are Meant to show Pesce’s”radical Experimentation” with materiality and manufacturing procedures. Featuring jagged and rough edges, and lively shapes, he refused to conform to the conventional modern style popular in the time of their own making.

Stacked glass bricks form the legs of Golgotha Table, which Is topped with a painterly, reddish resin surface

“Pesce’s groundbreaking experimentation with industrial and Everyday materials such as polyurethanes and poured resins broke the mould of standardisation,” the gallery stated. “Inventing techniques that could create variable results that adopted flaws and mistakes, he refused to follow the modernist ideology of regularity and perfection dominant at the time.”

“By refusing to adhere to traditional boundaries between Architecture, sculpture, and conceptual art, Pesce’s cross-contamination between genres consequentially altered the landscape of design and was a catalyst for the organization of the contemporary studio practice,” it added.

On display is a group of Yeti Armchairs, modular

Also featured in the display is a black version of Gaetano Pesce’s Up5 chair and a reddish Up6 pouff. The Italian designer is known worldwide for his Up furniture series, modelled after the form of a woman’s body. This season feminists criticised the designer after he installed an eight-metre high version of the Up5 armchair and Up6 footstool at Milan’s to the town’s design week.

Other designs include the modular Yeti Armchairs constructed With memory foam, and white buttons and upholstery

Pesce’s Moloch Floor Lamp uses anodised aluminium to create A flexible stand paired with a painted aluminum colour and base.

Black glass bricks stack on top of one another to form the Red resin has been used on the tabletop surface to provide the allusion that the material is dripping off the item.

A number of custom pieces Pesce made for the personal Apartment of Italian scientist Alberto Carenza will also be presented for the first time in the exhibition. Among these works is that the”eponymous monumental” Carenza Bookcase, a black and red shelving with jagged edges coated in epoxy resin.

Pesce utilized anodised aluminium and painted aluminum to Build Moloch Floor Lamp, that includes an adjustable height rack.

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